Posts tagged ‘Kevin Baldeosingh’

February 25, 2011

Biting satire from Kevin Baldeosingh in the Trinidad Express

Trinidad & Tobago’s preeminent satirist takes on the current call for equal rights legislation and  those who resist it. With his usual wit he draws an analogy between the current call and calls for equal rights from other groups in past. Like Jonathan Swift and his A Modest Proposal that urged the Irish to eat their children to solve the hunger problem , Kevin proves that satire can be the best way to get a point across.

“The law should not be changed to give equal rights to negroes, I mean homos. For one thing, pretending that they are equal to other human beings would encourage crime in the society. After all, negroes, I mean homos, were illegal persons in most parts of the civilised world up to the 19th century. When they were made legal, crime immediately started to rise, because it was no longer legal to kill the enslaved, I mean the depraved, and trying to legalise homos in Trinidad and Tobago would therefore worsen the crime rate. It is a well established theological and scientific fact that negroes, I mean homos, are prone to idleness, promiscuity, and violence. If we want to reduce crime, the police need to improve their detection rate, especially for sodomy.”

Read the rest of this soon to be classic piece  A Harangue on Homos here.

November 4, 2010

Shubh Deepawali and more…

Today, a large chunk of the world’s population celebrates Deepawali or Divali ( as it is known in this part of the world). It is the Hindu celebration of light over darkness and knowledge over ignorance. I am not a religious sort myself but I think  most of my readers would join in me wishing for a bit more knowledge rather than ignorance.

In other news, I think we can all feel a bit better that we live in a world where , thanks to Barcelona, the words Queer Kissing Flashmob can exist together. As I mentioned before this is meant to be a response to the imminent arrival of the Pope in Barcelona. His less than moderate views on the LGBT world have led the community to plan a kissing flash mob protest. Through several minutes of earnest digging on the web – okay, I just went to their Facebook page – I managed to find one of the posters for the event.

I hope his Holiness appreciates all the hard work and Photoshop work that went into preparing for his visit.

I have been uploading a number of past interviews I did to Vimeo recently to make them available to a wider audience. Though I seldom watch my own interviews I sat through one I did a few months ago with local writer, commentator and T&T Humanist Association founding member , Kevin Baldeosingh.  Much of the interview’s content is specific to Trinidad & Tobago, but it also deals with the responsibility of governments to make difficult decision about minority groups even when such protection isn’t popular with the general population. You can decide for yourself. I will say, though, Kevin is one of the smartest people I know, so it is worth a listen regardless. Abortion rights and LGBT rights starts at around the 12:31 mark.

In honor of Deepawali/Diwali might I suggest that everyone read India’s own Gaylaxymag.com

October 31, 2010

A thinking Trinidadian writes about the ex-gay visit

Kevin Baldeosingh of the Trinidad Express is one of  my favorite local columnists and one of the more thoughtful. He is also a member of the Trinidad and Tobago Humanist Association and has been a guest on my program several times.  Today he wrote an insightful article on the subject of the ex-gay minister who visited Trinidad last week:

“Evangelical Christians and Catholics came together last week to lobby against homosexual relationships. The Emmanuel Community, Lawyers for Jesus, and the Hospital Christian Fellowship brought down an American pastor as their point man to give talks at various forums in Trinidad and Tobago. Philip Lee claims to have been a homosexual from 18 to 35 years of age, after which he became heterosexual. In his talks given over the past week, Lee asserted that no one was born homosexual and that gayness was “acquired behaviour”. This statement is not borne out by scientific research, however.

But can sexual orientation be changed? Psychiatrist Gerard Hutchinson, a professor at UWI’s Medical School, says, “The jury is still out. Probably not, but it can be masked. Men in their 50s and 60s are now coming out and admitting that they are gay in spite of marriage and children, so orientation does not necessarily equal action.”

Read more here.

June 19, 2008

Get Smart

 

It is a genuine pity that blogs are not self-sustaining entities that, like cacti, can live happily and bloom with no intervention. It has now been a full week since my last entry and I am here more out of guilt than anything. Not, I hasten to add, that guilt is normally a great motivator with me.  It was an odd sort of week anyhow and I spent much of it fuming over The Happening. Nothing irks me more than bad art – I swear. Actually, that is not entirely true as reading some reviewers expressing thoughts that this was really a good film sets me off slightly more. Roger Ebert, a critic I normally respect, is way off the mark on this one. I wonder if MNS craftily slipped  something into his popcorn?

 

Work has been the usual slew of murders and the rather macabre spectacle of the Minister of National Security screwing his face up in response to a question from a reporter at the post cabinet briefing and saying “don’t you think this situation pains me?”. Ummm. The question is not how you feel about crime the question is what you are doing about the homicides right now…not in three years or next year. Sure there are many things that need to be done socially in the long term but people want the carnage to at least slow down now. I don’t understand why the goodly Minister can’t understand that a good plan involves stemming the leak in the dam immediately while at the same time building a replacement for it upstream. He simply seems not to get it.

 

I had Kevin Baldeosingh on the programme this week and he is always one of my favourite guests. He is an author, columnist, raconteur and genuinely funny person. He is also a secular humanist which fits into my world view just fine and means I don’t have to roll my eyes back too often in an interview.  I am hoping we can get him more involved in television as people that smart and funny are pretty thin on the ground in these parts. This brings me to the title of this entry which is also an artfully crafted reference to the new Get Smart movie that will, no doubt, be less funny than the original TV series.  Things in life and especially my life seem to come in spurts. It will be a drought of something and then I will find myself surrounded by it. Of late this has been the case with highly intelligent people…geniuses if you will.  I am not a slouch in the IQ department but I happily recognise there are many people more intelligent than me. Sitting with Kevin and chatting on the programme was great because he has a tremendous range of knowledge and, simply by using his insight, is able to shed a different light on a number of topics. His take that the start of the current crime wave is traceable to the sudden importance of the Unemployment Relief Programme ( aka Government make work project which is riddled with nefarious activities and undoubtedly questionable spending) was a clever and analytical approach to the problem. I am not sure he is smarter than me but he certainly thinks differently. Then I had Dr. Roodal Moonilal the MP for Oropouche East on the programme. I never realised it before but the man has a PhD done on full scholarship at The Hague. As far as I know those are not handed out willy nilly. 

 

It is an odd coincidence that my cousin Peggy ( just realised that sounds like My Cousin Vinny) was also here recently and she is a bona fide genius. I thought she was probably the smartest person I would ever encounter until I met someone recently ( who shall remain nameless for privacy reasons) who is also a certified genius. Intriguingly, while they are of different genders, they are quite similar in both temperament and making me feel that I am a few steps behind them. They also both possess that annoying feature of true geniuses that they are able to do so many things astoundingly well their only problem is in figuring out what to focus on. They were both child prodigies which is a blog entry by itself. Strangely, they are also both able to read music despite one being in science and the other in the arts . 

 

Anyone who knows me or reads this blog knows that I generally keep younger people at a great arms length since I simply have no interest in talking about what is happening with Britney. Thanks to The Nameless One I now have the odd experience of speaking to someone who is much younger than me  about the finer points of particle physics and the relevance of the repo rate to the bigger economic picture. What is even stranger for me is accepting the fact that I am dealing with someone who beats my IQ by several points and is definitely smarter despite a more than **ahem** 10 year difference in age. I will never be able to fully understand Chaos Theory in anything but the most rudimentary way ( though I know it is extremely important) and it rather freaks me out that there is someone I am talking to who can look at the formulas and see sense. 

 

On the bright side, while I must accept my own limitations, I can see that there are people who can truly change the world in their own fields. As someone who is frequently surrounded by self-important people with jacked up views of themselves it also heartens me to know that these smart people have no airs and are all amazingly humble. I feel privileged to have encountered both Peggy and The Nameless One  in my lifetime. I am the better for it.

 

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