Archive for October 8th, 2010

October 8, 2010

Interview with T& T Fashion Icon – Meiling

This is part 1 of my interview with her that aired this week. Part 2 will be uploaded  when Quicktime stops annoying me.

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October 8, 2010

Required reading.

“His favorite songs were Nat King Cole’s “Smile” and Bobby Darin’s “Beyond the Sea,” and he listened to Mozart in the shower. His favorite stop in Bakersfield was Barnes & Noble; he liked James Herriot’s books about animals.

He was a gentle child, they say, who preferred to “relocate bugs” rather than kill them, who made sure his younger brother got his share of Easter eggs and who once apologized to a bed of flowers when he picked one and placed it on the grave of the family dog.”

L A Times

They were not just numbers or faceless statistics. Every kid who is bullied into suicide is an amazing life with unbelievable potential. This column from the Los Angeles Times is a touching insight into the short life of little Seth Walsh through the eyes of his grandparents. It should be required reading. TIME also has an excellent article on Seth remembered. At least his little heart is still beating in the chest of a boy in LA whose life his  donation helped save.

October 8, 2010

An amazing community

Quick look at people who look at my little blog..

And more…

And that ignores the Polish, Russian and Slovakian  hits. Never mind the rest of the world,

Thank you all for  checking  this blog,

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October 8, 2010

Canada rocks.

Whenever I see another Canadian on my blog I raise my hand in the air. I used to march for rights in Toronto in the 80s ( miss you Eldon) and I celebrate what we achieved. Thanks to everyone who visits but special thanks to  every Canadian who  visits and  to all the American cousins who visit. I see small towns across the US  who arrive on my blog and I think  how wonderful it is that someone living in relative isolation can still fill their thirst for knowledge.

October 8, 2010

8. the mormon proposition

I have watched the documentary 8. the mormon proposition twice in the last few days. The first time I saw it I was alone and sat on my couch getting angrier and angrier that any group would oppose the right of two people to marry. The fact it was largely funded by a Utah based church with a history that would qualify it for an Oscar in hypocrisy made it all the more obscene. Here is a trailer for the film that I would urge everyone to see – it isn’t just about California – it is about how religions, protected by tax free status, can use their power to justify the continued inequity being meted out to one group of people.

The second time I saw it was the very next day when one of my best friends Alvin joined me for my evening walk and then came home with me to have dinner. I told him he had to see it and I watched it again with him.  I saw him getting more and more irate and asking questions about the mormons ( I refuse to dignify them with a capital letter) to the point that I worried about any mormon who happened to be in his path as he headed home afterwards.  Alvin is a strong and rare activist for the gay community in Trinidad and doesn’t seem to give a damn what people tell him. The film hurt him deeply and he is now getting even more active in raising his lone but loud voice to deal with the issues.  I think it is important that we see films like this and read as many blogs and news sources as we can. The problem is not a California problem  – it is a worldwide problem. As a Canadian I could say that equality is part of my constitution and forget the rest of the world – that would be plainly wrong. As long as there is a single person in the worldwide family who feels he or she is a second class citizen none of us should sleep easy.

Back to the film.  It details the fight of the LGBT community in California ,who had only recently been allowed to marry,having to face a ballot proposition that defined marriage as between a man and a woman. It was a measure that the mormon church took very seriously as it was personally threatened by the notion of two people who love each other getting married. The film notes the irony of  a church ,which is based in Utah solely because other Americans chased them there as they believed in polygamy ,  challenging another group over marriage. It is well constructed and shows the reality of lives being crushed without wandering into manipulation. The financial actions of the mormons were appalling and shamelessly secretive as illustrated by documents obtained by the filmmakers.

Prop 8 is still awaiting a court decision but I would urge anyone to join the NOH8 Campaign even if you don’t live in California. Sometimes worldwide support can help change things. Also, I don’t believe that religion has any special protection from criticism when it makes no sense . With that in mind I would like to point out that mormons have some seriously warped beliefs. God talks to your church elders personally? Really? The book just disappeared? Sure it did. Polygamy in the afterlife? Ummmm.

Hatred is an awful thing. I have no idea why people don’t see discrimination against the LGBT community as exactly the same as discrimination against any other group.  Perhaps if they had an LGBT child they might understand.  Whenever I see arguments using words like “choice” or “lifestyle” my blood boils. Seriously, why would anyone choose to be part of a group that suffers such prejudice?  I would encourage anyone who thinks about using the choice argument to read some  actual medical studies. Also, if you want to pick your fave Old Testament passages and use them as ammunition please ensure you read all the other weird things in there and follow them yourself.

As I was driving to my walking area this evening I actually saw two mormon missionaries in their short sleeved polyester shirts walking along the road – I am not one to hate but it was all I could do not to yank my Ford’s steering wheel in their direction. That is the sign of a good documentary. Or it could just be a sign of my hatred of white polyester shirts.

For the rest of us we can do small things. Let’s show NOH8 that the world cares, let’s write about teenage suicide and show how it reflects on a lack of acceptance and let’s just reach out and show that we care. This month has two big days coming up.  October 11th is Coming Out Day – I think people should do that only if it is safe to do so and if they have a strong support network of friends.

More importantly to me, by far,  is Spirit Day on October 20, 2010. To celebrate all the lives lost to suicide because of bullying and we have the sad deaths of six kids lately to make that a reality for all of us. Wear purple on October 20, 2010 – let’s show that the concern is worldwide.

Support NOH8

Spirit Day on Facebook

or here.

And as always support GLAAD – as a media person I take them very seriously.

And the brave souls in Utah who work in the belly of the beast.