Posts tagged ‘Anderson Cooper’

March 17, 2013

Anderson Cooper Accepts the GLAAD Victor Russo Award

March 17, 2013

Madonna Presents Anderson Cooper with the GLAAD Victor Russo Award.

July 2, 2012

Anderson Cooper Just Got Even Cooler ( if that is actually possible)

No point going into the already widely distributed details but Anderson Cooper, CNN’s most prominent journalist and one of the world’s most recognizable personalities finally confirmed what many already took for granted.

Via Think Progress

Also, seeing as he is a journalist best known for fearlessness, integrity and honesty – that sort of blows views people in some quarters may have about gay people.

 

January 17, 2012

Second Class Citizens

Completely US  specific but excellent. Via George Takei

October 20, 2011

Spirit Day 2011

I thought of putting up an inspiring music video for Spirit Day, I toyed with recording myself  saying something pithy ( if I could have avoided crying), but this is a really important day for me for many reasons. It is partly because  I was bullied in various ways as a kid and that I am still dealing with that internalized self-hatred even now but it is more about the fact that LGBT kids today are still facing it. This subject  brought some amazing people into my life last year. My little blog and my posts led me to meet Eric. Meg and Clay. Three people I adore and treasure and will do so forever despite the fact Eric ,who was the most wonderful person I have ever met,  was murdered along with his kid Cooper.

Spirit Day is not just a feel good  thing, it is about life and death. If we wear purple and kids see they have other LGBT people or allies around them – they see a safe harbor. Maybe, just maybe,  if you wear purple a kid who is feeling hopeless will see that he or she has someone they can talk to and  you can tell them it is okay to be exactly the way they are.

So I have decided to post Anderson Cooper’s excellent discussion about bullying as my Spirit Day tribute to all of our wonderful kids who were bullied to death. Thanks to my friend Dave of SuchisLifeVideos on Youtube for recording so many things that are relevant to our lives.  Kind of hard typing this as the videos have me crying.

Happy Spirit Day! We have a long way to go before our kids are safe from bullying.

September 22, 2011

Following on the previous post.

Dave of Such is Life Videos on YouTube has posted the latest Anderson Cooper piece on the Jamey Rodemeyer suicide. Cooper talks to the family about the bullying.

February 25, 2011

CNN: A cry in the night from Tripoli

Anderson Cooper’s  heartbreaking interview with an anonymous woman in Tripoli as she fears for her nation and her own life. Her appeal for the rest of the world to intervene and stop the carnage brought me to tears.

Apologies for the commercial at the beginning.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

CNN.com Video, posted with vodpod
February 10, 2011

Human Rights First looks at the Muslim Brotherhood

Human Rights First has posted an interesting true or false series of questions about the Muslim Brotherhood ( no women there I guess) as it relates to the current struggle in Egypt.

I read the post from HRF earlier but after watching a discussion on Anderson Cooper 360 which included Somalia born Dutch feminist Ayaan Hirsi Ali and her concerns about the effects that the Muslim Brotherhood government could have on the rights of women and LGBT people I thought it was important to post it.

The Neil Hicks article paints the overall picture and then goes on to answer the questions:

A major problem with speculations about the future role of the Brotherhood is that they are just that—speculations. This is uncharted territory for Egypt. No one—possibly not even the Brotherhood—knows right now what it might do if it is presented with an opportunity to run openly in free elections. Bold assertions of what they will or will not do should be viewed with skepticism. The Brotherhood have already stated that they do not intend to run a candidate for the presidency. There is no doubt that in a future, more open political climate in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood will be a force on the scene.

There are valid concerns about what the impact of the Muslim Brotherhood might be, and there are steps that responsible authorities in Egypt (whoever they might be) would be well advised to take to guard against threats to human rights and the development of an enduring democratic system in a new Egypt.

Interestingly, while the article paints a picture of the Muslim Brotherhood as moderate it notes that when it comes to the rights of women and religious minorities ( and one would assume other minorities too) there needs to be constitutional protection ASAP.

A stronger role for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt’s government presents a potential threat to women’s rights, the rights of religious minorities and basic political freedoms. TRUE

    The Brotherhood has an ambiguous position on many human rights issues, notably on the rights of women and religious minorities and on freedom of expression. For example, a policy platform that was released in 2007 required that the President of the Republic could not be a woman, and provided for a Council of Islamic scholars who would vet legislation for its compatibility with Islam, following the pattern of the Council of Guardians in the Islamic Republic of Iran. The publication of this regressive platform caused rare open disputes between Brotherhood leaders, some of whom objected strongly to its contents. One can speculate about what the public platform of a free Muslim Brotherhood would include, but there’s no question that the tendency of the Brotherhood to arrogate to itself the right to judge what constitutes proper Islamic practice and to condemn practice it finds un-Islamic presents risks to the enjoyment of basic rights and freedoms by many Egyptians. Brotherhood supporters speak of “Islamic democracy;” they note that the overwhelming majority of Egyptians are Muslims (which is true) and that many are pious believers (also true). Some take the leap of suggesting that as the Brotherhood is the party of Islam, they automatically speak for this majority and should therefore prevail. Such thinking is a threat to democratic principles.

    Read the full Q & A here.

 

February 9, 2011

Anderson Cooper tells it like it is on 360

When Anderson Cooper gets passionate he transforms from being an excellent journalist into something much more. As was the case with his Katrina coverage he lets his feelings show sometimes and that makes for powerful television. Last night he aimed his guns at Mubarak’s repressive regime.

( embedding has been disabled so just click through to see it on YouTube.

And for anyone who didn’t see Anderson getting angry during Katrina coverage  here is an example:

October 30, 2010

Saturday food for thought.

In checking my usual internet sources I came across a couple of sharable videos that I shall now post here. The first is a touching message for the It Gets Better Project from Bishop Mark Hanson who is the Presiding Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.  Like Anglican Bishop Sprong , whose manifesto I posted in an earlier entry, and unlike the rabid rhetoric of the religious right ( beat that alliteration!) , Hanson’ s message to kids is one of inclusion and love.

Via Box Turtle Bulletin

The other clip is a follow-up to the matter involving the hate-mongering disgrace to humanity called  Clint McCance – an Arkansas school board member. This is the man expressed puzzlement about the fuss over a bunch of dead f@@gots and suggesting he would wear purple only if all gay people killed themselves. While such things might be acceptable in Uganda or some other place where ignorance conspires to turn an entire nation into a hell hole, it has no place in the civilized world.  CNN’s Anderson Cooper who is the de facto patron Saint of the anti-bullying movement  took McCance to task as I posted earlier. He followed up on the matter with TV psychologist Dr. Phil.

Via Towleroad

 

And speaking of Uganda, and I was, here is a food-for-thought from a gay Ugandan blogger. Interesting to see how the internet has allowed the various hate incidents around the world to become interwoven into a global discussion.

More postings as the day goes on.