Posts tagged ‘Civil rights’

June 13, 2012

Different sex, same God? Same sex, different God!

The Trinidad & Tobago Humanist Association weighs in on the current move to have equal rights for LGBT people in the T&T Equal Opportunity Act ( for protection from various forms of  discrimination).

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May 19, 2012

Angela Davis speaks about Gay Rights

A significant figure in the US civil rights movement makes a lot of sense. May 2012 at the Université Libre de Bruxelles.

 

January 4, 2012

Excellent video – The Story of Human Rights

Via  I AM EQUAL

Really good video explaining the history of human rights and how each of us has a role in ensuring we all have dignity and justice.

January 2, 2012

Sean Chapin – I’m Married And I Know It

I really like the usually subversive Sean Chapin’s newest music video – a take on “Sexy And I Know It” by LMFAO. After seeing  ‘8: The Mormon Proposition’ I understand how upset a lot of Californians must be. They really need a scenario like here in Canada where the Supreme Court determines that marriage disparity is unconstitutional  and then all the states would fall like dominoes. It is inevitable, so the forces against all people having equal rights to love and marry who they choose will lose no matter how much they fight to forestall it. Heteronormativity is the new racism.

When I walk down the aisle, this is what I see – everybody stops and they staring at me. I got rainbows on my ring and I ain’t afraid to show it… (this is a gay marriage thang).

Parody of “Sexy And I Know It” by LMFAO about marriage equality for gay and straight couples.

Check out Sean’s channel here – he really is a tireless fighter.

November 4, 2010

False equivalence

In following some of the many debates on LGBT matters globally I have noticed a tendency to believe that both sides  carry equal weight. This especially bothered me in a recent NPR radio programme on school bullying in which, in what must have been a misguided attempt at ‘fairness’ , some right wing  religious groups we allowed to give ‘their side’ of the issue. Following that logic during the US Civil rights movement should have considered the feelings of the bigots before marching from Selma to Montgomery.

As usual, Timothy Kincaid of  Box Turtle Bulletin gives a thoughtful analysis of false equivalence. I don’t necessarily agree with his charitable view but the substance of the article is indisputable.

I am becoming increasingly frustrated by the notion of “balance” that some in the anti-gay industry are espousing.

I support the right of those who believe that homosexual acts are sinful and wish to encourage abstinence to have their voices heard. And those who think that the social acceptance of same-sex couples in society reduces public morality and will lead to social ills should be given the space to present their case.

But the false equivalencies that have been presented lately do not speak to an exchange of ideas, but rather to the assumptions of entitlement to which anti-gay activists think they are due.

The counterbalance to “I wish to advocate for gay rights” is not “you must be kept silent.” And there is no moral equivalency between “I wish to live unharmed” and “I wish to beat you to submission.” Yet these are not greatly exaggerated from that which we see presented.

Read more here.

 

November 2, 2010

As  marriage equality continues before the courts in California regarding Proposition 8 in Perry vs Schwarzenegger both sides have been been presenting their cases. As part of the process, supporters of each side are allowed to provide amicus briefs (or amicus curiae) which is informed testimony presented with a view to helping the court decide the case.

Howard University School of Law Civil Rights Clinic has weighed in on the matter. As one of the oldest black universities in the US, the Howard School of Law is quick to make a connection between this struggle and the struggle that black Americans had to endure not too long ago.

VIA Box Turtle Bulletin

Marriage is a symbol of civil freedom, a marker of social equality, a badge of full citizenship, and a social resource of irreplaceable value. Yet this fundamental expression of human dignity has also been misused as a political sieve for separating individuals into a preferred class, to which society grants a broad complement of legal rights and privileges, and a lesser class, to which it accords less than a full measure of equality. Such was the case when slaves prior to Reconstruction and interracial couples in the days of segregation were denied full marriage equality. Today, while there is no longer any serious claim that marriage rights should be denied on the basis of race, opponents of marriage equality have attacked same-sex couples, using precisely the same flawed arguments that oncewere used to justify racial slavery and apartheid. We are now long past the time when anyone would seriously claim that race-based marriage equality threatens the moral fabric of our civilization, is contrary to nature, or is harmful to children.Therefore, the onus should be on opponents of marriage equality to demonstrate how arguments that time and experience have so thoroughly rejected in the context of race should now be dug up, dusted off, and given any consideration, much less credibility, in the context of marriage for same-sex couples.

Read the rest on Scribd here – and it makes for a pretty compelling read..

October 26, 2010

Bishop Tutu speaks out – again

I really don’t see how people fail to see that discrimination based on gender identity is just as wrong as discrimination based on race . Bishop Tutu , who has considerable experience in the latter,  understands. He speaks out in an open letter to Essence magazine. Thanks to CAISO and my friend Alvin for the link.

Today I pray for people in Africa and throughout the world who long for freedom because they are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. It grieves me to be retiring at this crucial moment in history, so I write to you in this open letter, to invite you to pick up the work that remains to be done. More than 70 countries still imprison or execute gay and transgender people, and bullying and murders are all too common. This must change.

Read more here.