Posts tagged ‘CNN’

July 2, 2012

Anderson Cooper Just Got Even Cooler ( if that is actually possible)

No point going into the already widely distributed details but Anderson Cooper, CNN’s most prominent journalist and one of the world’s most recognizable personalities finally confirmed what many already took for granted.

Via Think Progress

Also, seeing as he is a journalist best known for fearlessness, integrity and honesty – that sort of blows views people in some quarters may have about gay people.

 

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November 28, 2011

India keeps moving along – “30 Minutes: My child is gay” IBN-LIVE

Via Gaypersecution insrilanka on FB

September 21, 2011

I have much admiration for Anderson Cooper

This was last night and there was another moving story tonight from Anderson Cooper – few people follow these awful stories as doggedly as Anderson. I will upload tonight’s video as soon as it is available. As the wonderful late Amy Winehouse said – tears dry on their own.

March 5, 2011

Surrey and England Wicket-Keeper-Batsman Steven Davies On Coming Out

Via YouTube

“Steven Davies, the 24-year-old Surrey and England wicketkeeper, has become the latest high-profile sportsman to announce he is gay. Davies is the first serving professional cricketer to ‘out’ himself.”

February 25, 2011

CNN: A cry in the night from Tripoli

Anderson Cooper’s  heartbreaking interview with an anonymous woman in Tripoli as she fears for her nation and her own life. Her appeal for the rest of the world to intervene and stop the carnage brought me to tears.

Apologies for the commercial at the beginning.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

CNN.com Video, posted with vodpod
February 24, 2011

Touching CNN video of crowds greeting Ben Wedeman in Benghazi

Jubilant crowds greet Ben Wedeman of CNN – the first Western journalist to arrive in Benghazi. The joy in the faces of the people speaks volumes even as they face possible retaliation from their brutal former leader.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

CNN.com Video, posted with vodpod

 

February 11, 2011

Hosni Mubarak – deaf to the voice of his people

Today the people of Egypt and the rest of the world were subjected to the greatest letdown in recent history as Hosni Mubarak defiantly ignored the voices of his people in Tahrir Square and refused to step down. What did he do? He handed over some of his powers to VP Sulieman – a man described as his vice-torturer by an interview subject on TV today.

How a leader can be so disconnected from the voice of his people when he can see millions of them protesting on TV ( admittedly not on state TV – but I am sure even Mubarak has access to Al Jazeera or CNN) and then give them the finger is beyond me. How he can have his state information agencies say that eleven people have died when he must know that it is over three hundred – because his secret police killed them – is equally beyond me.

What Mubarak doesn’t understand is that ordinary Egyptians are calling for him to leave. That ordinary Egyptians are leaving their families ( or even taking them with them), the comfort of their homes,  their jobs and their safety to lie in the cold in Tahrir Square. The world can learn a lesson from the people of Egypt – that the best interest of your fellow citizens and your country is more important than yourself. The same can be seen for other groups fighting for rights.

When Mubarak refers in his speech to those trying to create a bad image of Egypt and suggesting that foreign satellite stations are doing it, he is being a fool. All the world sees is the people of Egypt demanding their rights and for him to get the hell out of their country.

A  guest on BBC World Service radio today said that Mubarak is “old, senile and stupid”. I honestly can’t disagree.

And while I was serial tweeting the happenings in Egypt today I noted that some were suggesting  that people should be concentrating on things in their own homelands if they were not Egyptian.. I think not. We are all part of humanity, and thanks to social networking we can be part of events around the world.  There is something called solidarity and it means a lot to the people who are struggling – whether to reclaim their country or to be given basic human rights like the LGBT community or the elderly or the dispossessed. We are all part of humanity and thus, thanks to the internet, part of a human struggle for rights. If my library card price goes up it isn’t more  important than people sleeping in the streets of Cairo or Alexandria to be given a real representative government.

And on a side note, on Facebook a friend with Egyptian connections asked me what I thought about the events today. I am not saying I am politically correct or diplomatic but I answered “As a journalist, I would say he is a desperate Despot. As a person I would say he is a fucktard.”

Right now  we are all Egyptian.

February 5, 2011

Al Jazeera’s commentary on US media coverage of Egypt

Via @GeorgiaP

February 4, 2011

Shooting the messenger

Today was not a good day in Egypt for either the current regime and its credibility or for journalists who seek to tell the story of what is happening.

Based on coverage online and traditional media such as Al Jazeera, CNN, BBC, ABC, And CNN-IBN it is fairly safe to say that the regime has decided that attacking journalists and  trying to cut off media coverage of what has been happening is the best way to achieve their objectives.  Journalists, like me, are being detained, beaten up and generally stopped from doing our job. The police are searching for us and attempting to intimidate us into being silent. Just to make sure it works they are also  closing down bureaus and confiscating cameras and equipment as they did with the BBC today. Al Arabiya had its staff brutalized and bloodied.  Anderson Cooper had his head punched yesterday and today (according to his Twitter feed) had his car windows smashed in. This evening he had to do his program from a sealed off hotel room.

Al Jazeera, the hero of this revolution,which  has been banned from Egypt, and  told its bureau had to  close down,  had four of its journalists held today. If this is what Mubarak wants to show the world –  then he has achieved  a  perfect picture of what life under Mubarak means. In their usual ‘screw you’ manner Al Jazeera has continued their coverage and will, no doubt, be back live in Cairo tomorrow.

There is no more live footage of what is happening in central Cairo because Mubarak and his goons have made it so. Remember  Tiananmen Square where the man stood in front of the tank and  stopped – the next step was to remove the media and then exact carnage on protesters.  Even when when we are disliked  the media keeps governments honest. That is what we do at best. In most democracies we don’t have to fear for our lives but Egypt, just in case anyone didn’t know it, is NOT a democracy.

Perhaps the most telling thing today was  that Nile TV reporter, Shahira Amin, who has been with the station since 1989  decided that enough was enough and chucked her job and joined her people in the square. I hope she is safe.

Those of us who demand human rights in other areas are familiar with the fact that we have to deal with being targeted by governments. Mubarak may well end up destroying protests but he will be be doomed regardless. The world has seen his evil and brutality.  The world and the people of Egypt have seen his methods and have seen how desperate he is not to see those methods exposed to the light of day.

When you target journalists and shut down the internet you show only that you operate best in darkness.  Most things don’t survive in darkness- and they shouldn’t.

To my colleagues in the mainstream media forced to risk their lives to cover the story – I salute you – I only wish I were there to tell the story with you.

( Thanks to Eric in NC for checking my post written in a state of extreme anger)

November 10, 2010

A contagiously positive Ricky Martin on Larry King

Needs no explanation.