Posts tagged ‘despot’

February 24, 2011

The Telegraph reports that Britain is poised to seize Gaddafi’s assets

The  Telegraph is reporting that the UK government is in the process of  rounding up the assets of the Libyan regime with an aim to forcing Gaddafi out in the most effective way possible – hitting him in the bank account.

“In total, the Libyan regime is said to have around £20 billion in liquid assets, mostly in London. These are expected to be frozen as part of an international effort to force the dictator from power. A Whitehall source said: “The first priority is to get British nationals out of Libya. But then we are ready to move in on Gaddafi’s assets, the work is under way. This is definitely on the radar at the highest levels.”

Read the rest in the Telegraph here.

Let’s hope this is one more brick being pulled out from the foundations of  this ugly man’s regime.

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February 22, 2011

Gaddafi not worried – his supporters have his back – maybe

The comic genius of my Twitter friend @TF_Touya

By Nabeel "Touya" Mohammed - used with permission.

See the original post here.

February 22, 2011

Analogy of the day – Libya

The bloodthirsty Gaddafi just made it abundantly clear that he doesn’t plan to go anywhere and will kill as many as it takes to stay in power. In a protracted rant the despot, likened the protesters to rats on hallucinogenic drugs.  As the BBC reports:

“The protesters had been given drink and drugs, he said, frequently shouting and banging his fist on the table as the address continued.

He called on “those who love Muammar Gaddafi” to come on to the streets in support of him, telling them not to be afraid of the “gangs”

Read article here.

Yet another tyrant realizes that the people will not be silent even if they must die to achieve change .

So, here we have King Lear with his fool futilely raging against the storm.

William Dyce, King Lear and the Fool in the Storm (c. 1851)

And here we have just a fool railing against his own people.

Courtesy Al Jazeera.

The end result will be the same – just saying.

February 11, 2011

Hosni Mubarak – deaf to the voice of his people

Today the people of Egypt and the rest of the world were subjected to the greatest letdown in recent history as Hosni Mubarak defiantly ignored the voices of his people in Tahrir Square and refused to step down. What did he do? He handed over some of his powers to VP Sulieman – a man described as his vice-torturer by an interview subject on TV today.

How a leader can be so disconnected from the voice of his people when he can see millions of them protesting on TV ( admittedly not on state TV – but I am sure even Mubarak has access to Al Jazeera or CNN) and then give them the finger is beyond me. How he can have his state information agencies say that eleven people have died when he must know that it is over three hundred – because his secret police killed them – is equally beyond me.

What Mubarak doesn’t understand is that ordinary Egyptians are calling for him to leave. That ordinary Egyptians are leaving their families ( or even taking them with them), the comfort of their homes,  their jobs and their safety to lie in the cold in Tahrir Square. The world can learn a lesson from the people of Egypt – that the best interest of your fellow citizens and your country is more important than yourself. The same can be seen for other groups fighting for rights.

When Mubarak refers in his speech to those trying to create a bad image of Egypt and suggesting that foreign satellite stations are doing it, he is being a fool. All the world sees is the people of Egypt demanding their rights and for him to get the hell out of their country.

A  guest on BBC World Service radio today said that Mubarak is “old, senile and stupid”. I honestly can’t disagree.

And while I was serial tweeting the happenings in Egypt today I noted that some were suggesting  that people should be concentrating on things in their own homelands if they were not Egyptian.. I think not. We are all part of humanity, and thanks to social networking we can be part of events around the world.  There is something called solidarity and it means a lot to the people who are struggling – whether to reclaim their country or to be given basic human rights like the LGBT community or the elderly or the dispossessed. We are all part of humanity and thus, thanks to the internet, part of a human struggle for rights. If my library card price goes up it isn’t more  important than people sleeping in the streets of Cairo or Alexandria to be given a real representative government.

And on a side note, on Facebook a friend with Egyptian connections asked me what I thought about the events today. I am not saying I am politically correct or diplomatic but I answered “As a journalist, I would say he is a desperate Despot. As a person I would say he is a fucktard.”

Right now  we are all Egyptian.