Posts tagged ‘@eqca’

October 12, 2010

A most interesting day…

 

One day everyone will have a place at the table.

 

It was a pretty exciting day for me and that isn’t even including the 19 stories we had in our newscast this evening.  It was a pretty significant day for observers of LGBT rights  as three developments in the US kept my Twitterfeed buzzing all afternoon.

The first:

At 1:34pm @PrideinUtah was to first to introduce this story to my feed ( and everyone needs to follow Pride in Utah):

BREAKING: Judge Orders Immediate End To DADT Discharges

Posted by Admin (Eric) at 1:34 PM. Placed in National/International category

California – (via the daily kos) U.S. district judge Virginia A. Phillips orders the Defense Department to ‘immediately to suspend and discontinue any investigation, or discharge, separation, or other proceeding.

Later on The Advocate posted an excellent analysis of what the development means.

A bit later on that news was dimmed a bit when I got a tweet from @GLADlaw ( an excellent group that I would urge everyone to support)  stating that

Today, the Department of Justice filed a notice of appeal in Gill v. Office of Personnel Management, GLAD’s challenge to Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).  The case was heard in May 2010 by U.S. District Court Judge Joseph L. Tauro, who issued a decision finding DOMA Section 3 unconstitutional on July 8, 2010. “

I guess that is part of the Administration being the ‘biggest supporter’ or maybe not. Read the full story from GLAD here.

Then I saw via @eqca ( Equality California) that

Florida’s ban on same-sex couples adopting children has been overturned and won’t be appealed: http://ow.ly/2Sy3G Congrats,Florida!”

A mixed day indeed. @PrideinUtah also posted a link to an interesting study from OkCupid :

Gay Sex vs. Straight Sex

I think it is interesting that they went to the trouble of undertaking the study and their reasoning is rather touching:

Gay issues have been in the news a lot lately, from the debate over same-sex marriage in Congress to a sickening rash of gay-bashing here in New York City. We see a lot of emotion out there, instead of information, and we wanted to provide some data-based context on sexuality so that people might make better choices about what they say, think, and do.

We run a massive dating site and therefore have unparalleled insight into sex and relationships. Here’s what we’ve found, in numbers and charts.

Good for them and pretty amazing their sample is 3.2 million users.

On a personal level I tried to do my little part. I did two interviews with the lovely Verna St. Rose Greaves today on bullying. Verna ( or Auntie Verna to many) is a social activist here who has dedicated her life to helping others and especially children and victims of abuse. She campaigned for the current government here which was her first foray into politics other than a brief senatorial position preceding the election. She is essentially out of politics now and she was my first choice to talk about the subject.

Most people love her but a lot of people also dislike her because of her principled stand against the death penalty. It may well be the reason she has no position in the current government. She is pretty fearless and has one of the biggest hearts I have ever encountered. We spoke about the responsibility that we all have in stopping an environment that encourages bullying and the feeling that it is okay to prey on those who are weaker or different in some way. I liked her statement that we should all put a camera in our home or workplace  and then rewind and look at how many of us practice some form of cruelty to those around us on an everyday basis. She dealt with things head on including dealing with bullying because of sexual orientation in which she said the fact we live in a homophobic environment makes it even harder for those kids.

Towards the end of the second interview I asked Verna what she would say to one of the kids who is being bullied. She came close to tears when she spoke to camera and said that she was sorry because we are all responsible for not getting more involved. I was glad the camera stayed on her because I was actually closer to tears. I admitted during the interview that I had been bullied relentlessly in elementary and high school. I guess that makes the interview my little contribution to the “It Gets Better” project.

I will try and upload the interviews after the second one airs tomorrow.

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