Posts tagged ‘January 25’

February 20, 2011

And how are the protests going in the Arab World?

As thousands if not millions of people in the Arab world struggle for their rights in the face of  repressive regimes it is becoming clear that the protesters are braver than most of us. In Libya, Bahrain and throughout the region people are losing their lives just asking for their rights to have a voice in their country.

Puts your weekend in perspective.

Libya.

Bahrain

In Yemen.

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February 16, 2011

The Birth of a New Egypt

Via Ayman Mohyeldin

February 15, 2011

Stunning video collage: Egypt Revolution from the Start to the end.

Via@iYassin

A visually stunning collection of images and footage of  revolution in Egypt  that led the ouster of  Hosni Mubarak. Clearly a  lot of blood sweat and tears went into editing this and it is well worth  viewing. The tribute to the fallen is deeply touching. So many lives lost in the pursuit of basic human and economic rights.

If the embed doesn’t work try clicking here.

PATRIOTISM
Innominatus
Sir Walter Scott  1771-1832

BREATHES there the man with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,
‘This is my own, my native land!’
Whose heart hath ne’er within him burn’d
As home his footsteps he hath turn’d
From wandering on a foreign strand?
If such there breathe, go, mark him well;
For him no Minstrel raptures swell;
High though his titles, proud his name,
Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;
Despite those titles, power, and pelf,
The wretch, concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down
To the vile dust from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonour’d, and unsung.

February 11, 2011

Russia Today covers the fall of Hosni Mubarak

February 10, 2011

Human Rights First looks at the Muslim Brotherhood

Human Rights First has posted an interesting true or false series of questions about the Muslim Brotherhood ( no women there I guess) as it relates to the current struggle in Egypt.

I read the post from HRF earlier but after watching a discussion on Anderson Cooper 360 which included Somalia born Dutch feminist Ayaan Hirsi Ali and her concerns about the effects that the Muslim Brotherhood government could have on the rights of women and LGBT people I thought it was important to post it.

The Neil Hicks article paints the overall picture and then goes on to answer the questions:

A major problem with speculations about the future role of the Brotherhood is that they are just that—speculations. This is uncharted territory for Egypt. No one—possibly not even the Brotherhood—knows right now what it might do if it is presented with an opportunity to run openly in free elections. Bold assertions of what they will or will not do should be viewed with skepticism. The Brotherhood have already stated that they do not intend to run a candidate for the presidency. There is no doubt that in a future, more open political climate in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood will be a force on the scene.

There are valid concerns about what the impact of the Muslim Brotherhood might be, and there are steps that responsible authorities in Egypt (whoever they might be) would be well advised to take to guard against threats to human rights and the development of an enduring democratic system in a new Egypt.

Interestingly, while the article paints a picture of the Muslim Brotherhood as moderate it notes that when it comes to the rights of women and religious minorities ( and one would assume other minorities too) there needs to be constitutional protection ASAP.

A stronger role for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt’s government presents a potential threat to women’s rights, the rights of religious minorities and basic political freedoms. TRUE

    The Brotherhood has an ambiguous position on many human rights issues, notably on the rights of women and religious minorities and on freedom of expression. For example, a policy platform that was released in 2007 required that the President of the Republic could not be a woman, and provided for a Council of Islamic scholars who would vet legislation for its compatibility with Islam, following the pattern of the Council of Guardians in the Islamic Republic of Iran. The publication of this regressive platform caused rare open disputes between Brotherhood leaders, some of whom objected strongly to its contents. One can speculate about what the public platform of a free Muslim Brotherhood would include, but there’s no question that the tendency of the Brotherhood to arrogate to itself the right to judge what constitutes proper Islamic practice and to condemn practice it finds un-Islamic presents risks to the enjoyment of basic rights and freedoms by many Egyptians. Brotherhood supporters speak of “Islamic democracy;” they note that the overwhelming majority of Egyptians are Muslims (which is true) and that many are pious believers (also true). Some take the leap of suggesting that as the Brotherhood is the party of Islam, they automatically speak for this majority and should therefore prevail. Such thinking is a threat to democratic principles.

    Read the full Q & A here.

 

February 9, 2011

Russia Today looks at the source of Mubarak’s wealth.

February 9, 2011

Anderson Cooper tells it like it is on 360

When Anderson Cooper gets passionate he transforms from being an excellent journalist into something much more. As was the case with his Katrina coverage he lets his feelings show sometimes and that makes for powerful television. Last night he aimed his guns at Mubarak’s repressive regime.

( embedding has been disabled so just click through to see it on YouTube.

And for anyone who didn’t see Anderson getting angry during Katrina coverage  here is an example:

February 8, 2011

Wael Ghonim’s interview on Dream TV in Egypt – subtitles

Activist and Google executive Wael Ghonin is interviewed by Mona El Shazly following his release from prison. This is the third part of the interview ( with |English subtitles) and it is incredibly moving as he breaks down in tears when shown images of some of the dead.

Click the CC button at the bottom for the subtitles if you are not seeing them.

View part 1 here.

View Part 2 here.

February 5, 2011

Late posting but worth watching again.

This video is already several days old  but it is such a moving insight into the events in Egypt I had to post it.

The struggle for human rights is different everywhere but the spirit is the same.

February 5, 2011

Al Jazeera’s commentary on US media coverage of Egypt

Via @GeorgiaP