Posts tagged ‘Mubarak’

February 11, 2012

A Year Since Egypt Said “Yes We Can Too!”

One of the greatest examples of people power in my lifetime.

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February 15, 2011

Stunning video collage: Egypt Revolution from the Start to the end.

Via@iYassin

A visually stunning collection of images and footage of  revolution in Egypt  that led the ouster of  Hosni Mubarak. Clearly a  lot of blood sweat and tears went into editing this and it is well worth  viewing. The tribute to the fallen is deeply touching. So many lives lost in the pursuit of basic human and economic rights.

If the embed doesn’t work try clicking here.

PATRIOTISM
Innominatus
Sir Walter Scott  1771-1832

BREATHES there the man with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,
‘This is my own, my native land!’
Whose heart hath ne’er within him burn’d
As home his footsteps he hath turn’d
From wandering on a foreign strand?
If such there breathe, go, mark him well;
For him no Minstrel raptures swell;
High though his titles, proud his name,
Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;
Despite those titles, power, and pelf,
The wretch, concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down
To the vile dust from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonour’d, and unsung.

February 12, 2011

Jubilation and People Power

Via Kenn Orphan

As seen on GRITtv Egyptians celebrate in fine style with a song that is surely at the top of the charts there  right now.

February 11, 2011

Russia Today covers the fall of Hosni Mubarak

February 11, 2011

Hosni Mubarak – deaf to the voice of his people

Today the people of Egypt and the rest of the world were subjected to the greatest letdown in recent history as Hosni Mubarak defiantly ignored the voices of his people in Tahrir Square and refused to step down. What did he do? He handed over some of his powers to VP Sulieman – a man described as his vice-torturer by an interview subject on TV today.

How a leader can be so disconnected from the voice of his people when he can see millions of them protesting on TV ( admittedly not on state TV – but I am sure even Mubarak has access to Al Jazeera or CNN) and then give them the finger is beyond me. How he can have his state information agencies say that eleven people have died when he must know that it is over three hundred – because his secret police killed them – is equally beyond me.

What Mubarak doesn’t understand is that ordinary Egyptians are calling for him to leave. That ordinary Egyptians are leaving their families ( or even taking them with them), the comfort of their homes,  their jobs and their safety to lie in the cold in Tahrir Square. The world can learn a lesson from the people of Egypt – that the best interest of your fellow citizens and your country is more important than yourself. The same can be seen for other groups fighting for rights.

When Mubarak refers in his speech to those trying to create a bad image of Egypt and suggesting that foreign satellite stations are doing it, he is being a fool. All the world sees is the people of Egypt demanding their rights and for him to get the hell out of their country.

A  guest on BBC World Service radio today said that Mubarak is “old, senile and stupid”. I honestly can’t disagree.

And while I was serial tweeting the happenings in Egypt today I noted that some were suggesting  that people should be concentrating on things in their own homelands if they were not Egyptian.. I think not. We are all part of humanity, and thanks to social networking we can be part of events around the world.  There is something called solidarity and it means a lot to the people who are struggling – whether to reclaim their country or to be given basic human rights like the LGBT community or the elderly or the dispossessed. We are all part of humanity and thus, thanks to the internet, part of a human struggle for rights. If my library card price goes up it isn’t more  important than people sleeping in the streets of Cairo or Alexandria to be given a real representative government.

And on a side note, on Facebook a friend with Egyptian connections asked me what I thought about the events today. I am not saying I am politically correct or diplomatic but I answered “As a journalist, I would say he is a desperate Despot. As a person I would say he is a fucktard.”

Right now  we are all Egyptian.

February 10, 2011

Human Rights First looks at the Muslim Brotherhood

Human Rights First has posted an interesting true or false series of questions about the Muslim Brotherhood ( no women there I guess) as it relates to the current struggle in Egypt.

I read the post from HRF earlier but after watching a discussion on Anderson Cooper 360 which included Somalia born Dutch feminist Ayaan Hirsi Ali and her concerns about the effects that the Muslim Brotherhood government could have on the rights of women and LGBT people I thought it was important to post it.

The Neil Hicks article paints the overall picture and then goes on to answer the questions:

A major problem with speculations about the future role of the Brotherhood is that they are just that—speculations. This is uncharted territory for Egypt. No one—possibly not even the Brotherhood—knows right now what it might do if it is presented with an opportunity to run openly in free elections. Bold assertions of what they will or will not do should be viewed with skepticism. The Brotherhood have already stated that they do not intend to run a candidate for the presidency. There is no doubt that in a future, more open political climate in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood will be a force on the scene.

There are valid concerns about what the impact of the Muslim Brotherhood might be, and there are steps that responsible authorities in Egypt (whoever they might be) would be well advised to take to guard against threats to human rights and the development of an enduring democratic system in a new Egypt.

Interestingly, while the article paints a picture of the Muslim Brotherhood as moderate it notes that when it comes to the rights of women and religious minorities ( and one would assume other minorities too) there needs to be constitutional protection ASAP.

A stronger role for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt’s government presents a potential threat to women’s rights, the rights of religious minorities and basic political freedoms. TRUE

    The Brotherhood has an ambiguous position on many human rights issues, notably on the rights of women and religious minorities and on freedom of expression. For example, a policy platform that was released in 2007 required that the President of the Republic could not be a woman, and provided for a Council of Islamic scholars who would vet legislation for its compatibility with Islam, following the pattern of the Council of Guardians in the Islamic Republic of Iran. The publication of this regressive platform caused rare open disputes between Brotherhood leaders, some of whom objected strongly to its contents. One can speculate about what the public platform of a free Muslim Brotherhood would include, but there’s no question that the tendency of the Brotherhood to arrogate to itself the right to judge what constitutes proper Islamic practice and to condemn practice it finds un-Islamic presents risks to the enjoyment of basic rights and freedoms by many Egyptians. Brotherhood supporters speak of “Islamic democracy;” they note that the overwhelming majority of Egyptians are Muslims (which is true) and that many are pious believers (also true). Some take the leap of suggesting that as the Brotherhood is the party of Islam, they automatically speak for this majority and should therefore prevail. Such thinking is a threat to democratic principles.

    Read the full Q & A here.

 

February 9, 2011

Russia Today looks at the source of Mubarak’s wealth.

February 9, 2011

Anderson Cooper tells it like it is on 360

When Anderson Cooper gets passionate he transforms from being an excellent journalist into something much more. As was the case with his Katrina coverage he lets his feelings show sometimes and that makes for powerful television. Last night he aimed his guns at Mubarak’s repressive regime.

( embedding has been disabled so just click through to see it on YouTube.

And for anyone who didn’t see Anderson getting angry during Katrina coverage  here is an example:

February 4, 2011

Sandmonkey blogs from Cairo

Mahmoud Salem aka Sandmonkey is blogging a remarkable first-hand account from Cairo.  His vehicle  was destroyed while attempting to take food and water to protesters. He just spoke on CNN – desperate and at wit’s end.

I don’t know how to start writing this. I have been battling fatigue for not sleeping properly for the past 10 days, moving from one’s friend house to another friend’s house, almost never spending a night in my home, facing a very well funded and well organized ruthless regime that views me as nothing but an annoying bug that its time to squash will come. The situation here is bleak to say the least.

Read his blog here.

February 4, 2011

Shooting the messenger

Today was not a good day in Egypt for either the current regime and its credibility or for journalists who seek to tell the story of what is happening.

Based on coverage online and traditional media such as Al Jazeera, CNN, BBC, ABC, And CNN-IBN it is fairly safe to say that the regime has decided that attacking journalists and  trying to cut off media coverage of what has been happening is the best way to achieve their objectives.  Journalists, like me, are being detained, beaten up and generally stopped from doing our job. The police are searching for us and attempting to intimidate us into being silent. Just to make sure it works they are also  closing down bureaus and confiscating cameras and equipment as they did with the BBC today. Al Arabiya had its staff brutalized and bloodied.  Anderson Cooper had his head punched yesterday and today (according to his Twitter feed) had his car windows smashed in. This evening he had to do his program from a sealed off hotel room.

Al Jazeera, the hero of this revolution,which  has been banned from Egypt, and  told its bureau had to  close down,  had four of its journalists held today. If this is what Mubarak wants to show the world –  then he has achieved  a  perfect picture of what life under Mubarak means. In their usual ‘screw you’ manner Al Jazeera has continued their coverage and will, no doubt, be back live in Cairo tomorrow.

There is no more live footage of what is happening in central Cairo because Mubarak and his goons have made it so. Remember  Tiananmen Square where the man stood in front of the tank and  stopped – the next step was to remove the media and then exact carnage on protesters.  Even when when we are disliked  the media keeps governments honest. That is what we do at best. In most democracies we don’t have to fear for our lives but Egypt, just in case anyone didn’t know it, is NOT a democracy.

Perhaps the most telling thing today was  that Nile TV reporter, Shahira Amin, who has been with the station since 1989  decided that enough was enough and chucked her job and joined her people in the square. I hope she is safe.

Those of us who demand human rights in other areas are familiar with the fact that we have to deal with being targeted by governments. Mubarak may well end up destroying protests but he will be be doomed regardless. The world has seen his evil and brutality.  The world and the people of Egypt have seen his methods and have seen how desperate he is not to see those methods exposed to the light of day.

When you target journalists and shut down the internet you show only that you operate best in darkness.  Most things don’t survive in darkness- and they shouldn’t.

To my colleagues in the mainstream media forced to risk their lives to cover the story – I salute you – I only wish I were there to tell the story with you.

( Thanks to Eric in NC for checking my post written in a state of extreme anger)